Albuquerque NM

Maria Adela Lazcano and her daughter with El Zarandeado Mexican Seafood in Albuquerque NM

Cooking is an art says Maria Adela Lazcano owner of El Zarandeado Mexican Food Sinaloa Style located in Albuquerque, New Mexico. It took her 13 years to create the recipes for El Zarandeado Restaurant. Maria is originally from the state of Sinaloa, Mexico. Her recipes are inspired by the culinary traditions of Sinaloa, Nayarit and Sonora.

For example, el zarandeado is a traditional dish from Sinaloa that features the a kind of fish called Pargo. The fish is sliced in lengthwise and marinated before being baked in the oven. The result is a fish with a crunchy texture that is cooked evenly. The restaurant was named after this traditional dish that literally means “the shaked one.”

Maria is grateful to be running a family restaurant with the help of her daughters and her son. El Zarandeado has two locations in Albuquerque and her family collaborates in the operation of both. Family is very important to Maria. She told me that one of her major goals was to have her kids work alongside with her.

Although Maria is happy to live and work in the City of Albuquerque, she feels culturally connected with Mexico and wishes to open a restaurant in her home state of Sinaloa in the future. “My heart is in Mexico” she tells me “I want, god willing, I want to end up with a restaurant in Mexico.”

Maria Lazcano and her daughter with El Zarandeado Mexican Seafood in Albuquerque New Mexico

Maria Adela Lazcano (left) and her daughter with El Zarandeado Mexican Seafood Sinaloa style. Albuquerque, New Mexico. June 1, 2014.

Maria Lazcano with El Zarandeado Mexican Seafood in Albuquerque New Mexico

Owner Maria Lazcano holds a Sinaloa inspired seafood plate. Albuquerque, New Mexico. June 1, 2014.

Maria Lazcano and her daughter with El Zarandeado Mexican Seafood in Albuquerque New Mexico

Maria Adela Lazcano (left) and her daughter with El Zarandeado Mexican Seafood Sinaloa style. Albuquerque, New Mexico. June 1, 2014.

Maria Lazcano and her daughter with El Zarandeado Mexican Seafood

Maria Adela Lazcano (left) and her daughter with El Zarandeado Mexican Seafood Sinaloa style. Albuquerque, New Mexico. June 1, 2014.

Theresa Gonzales Co-Director at La Plazita Institute in Albuquerque NM

I met Theresa Gonzales at La Plazita Institute in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The organization works with the most marginalized and vulnerable population of the South Valley, which is a neighborhood just south of Albuquerque. Theresa experienced an unfavorable upbringing due to poverty and addiction problems in her family. She also faced education barriers and spent time in the streets. She refers to that experience as “street knowledge”. Despite the odds, she is an avid learner and is constantly looking to improve not only her life but also the community of the South Valley, New Mexico.

The South Valley is also referred to as the Town of Atrisco or the Atrisco Land Grant by people in the area. Theresa is a land grant heir of 2 historic land grants – the Town of Atrisco and Cañón de Carnué.

Theresa Gonzales Co-Director at La Plazita Institute in Albuquerque NM

Theresa Gonzales Co-Director at La Plazita Institute holds the organization’s Impact Model. The main categories are Personal Development, Family Wellness, Community Engagement, Institutional Engagement and Cultural Healing Services. In the background to the right, there is a photography exhibition highlighting La Plazita Institute’s programs. South Valley, New Mexico. May 30, 2014.

Theresa Gonzales Co-Director at La Plazita Institute in Albuquerque NM.

Theresa Gonzales Co-Director at La Plazita Institute poses in front of a mural that symbolizes oneness of spirit. The mural makes reference to Indigenous people, land, and water. The eagle represents strength, transformation and resiliency. Mural by Lonnie Anderson. South Valley, New Mexico. May 30, 2014.

Theresa Gonzales Co-Director at La Plazita Institute in Albuquerque NM.

The tattoo represents Theresa’s spiritual and physical journey. It represents her hardships in life, her transformations, her Indigenous roots, and desire to help others in need. The tattoo depicts a dragon, an Aztec serpent, a jaguar, an eagle among other symbols. Photographed at her office at La Plazita Institute on May 30, 2014. Mural in the background by Woody Bitsie.

Eliseo “Cheo” Torres author of “Curandero A Life in Mexican Folk Healing”

Eliseo “Cheo” Torres is the author of “Curandero A Life in Mexican Folk Healing” and “Healing with Herbs and Rituals” with Timothy L. Sawyer, Jr as editor. Both books were published by the University of New Mexico Press.

Eliseo Cheo Torres

Eliseo Cheo Torres author of Curandero A Life in Mexican Folk Healing. University of New Mexico. Albuquerque, New Mexico.  May 22, 2014.

Eliseo Cheo Torres author of Curandero A Life in Mexican Folk Healing

Eliseo Cheo Torres author of Curandero A Life in Mexican Folk Healing. University of New Mexico. Albuquerque, New Mexico. May 22, 2014.

Eliseo Cheo Torres author of Curandero A Life in Mexican Folk Healing

Eliseo Cheo Torres author of Curandero A Life in Mexican Folk Healing. University of New Mexico. Albuquerque, New Mexico.  May 22, 2014.

Juanita’s Comida Mexicana

In the Barelas neighborhood of Albuquerque, New Mexico I found Juanita’s Comida Mexicana. It’s a Mexican Restaurant run by Juanita who is originally from Namiquipa Chihuahua. She offers food inspired by her hometown’s ranch. Food prepared at Juanita’s Restaurant is enjoyed by Mexicans and Americans alike. She told me that Americans love the food because it reminds them of the food their grandparents would cook. Photos from May 20, 2014.

Juanita with Juanita's Comida Mexicana. Albuquerque, New Mexico.

Juanita with Juanita’s Comida Mexicana in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Barelas Neighborhood. May 20,2014.

Juanita with Juanita's Comida Mexicana. Albuquerque, New Mexico.

Juanita with Juanita’s Comida Mexicana in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Barelas Neighborhood. May 20, 2014.

Juanita with Juanita's Comida Mexicana. Albuquerque, New Mexico.

Juanita with Juanita’s Comida Mexicana in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Barelas Neighborhood. May 20, 2014.

Freddy Gutierrez and his 1949 Chevy Fleetline Deluxe

I visited the 30th Annual Car Show presented by the Albuquerque Museum and the New Mexico Council of Car Clubs on May 18, 2014. In the show I found a 1949 Chevy Fleetline Deluxe with a Mexican American themed interior. The car was customized by Freddy Gutierrez with Duke’s Car Club of the Albuquerque’s chapter who was kind to let me photograph his vehicle.

Inside the car, in a small tray, there is a cracked black and white photograph of Freddy’s dad who served in World War II. The car seats are covered with Zarapes and a Howdy Doody toy rides in the passenger’s seat. The mix of Mexican and American references inside the vehicle in very interesting. As a third generation Mexican American, Freddy pays tribute to his Mexican origins and embraces the American culture. I was very happy to make these images.

Freddie Gutierrez honoring his dad Frank Gutierrez

Freddie Gutierrez honoring his dad Frank Gutierrez. May 19, 2014. Albuquerque, NM.

Freddie Gutierrez and his Low Rider Memorabilia

Freddie Gutierrez and his Low Rider Memorabilia. May 19, 2014. Albuquerque, NM.

Freddie Gutierrez and his 1949 Chevy Fleetline Deluxe

Freddie Gutierrez and his 1949 Chevy Fleetline Deluxe. May 19, 2014. Albuquerque, NM.